The Battle of Buxar is a famous episode in the history of India, the English win at Plassey was marred by allegations of treachery, but victory at Buxar was a real feather in crown of their military capabilities. We shall not go much into the background of the war and waste time; rather we will straight away take a ride to the battle field.

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Part of Buxar fort, showing a shrine and ghat below, with people bathing and drawing water from the river

Buxar was then under Bengal territory a city about 130 kilometres West of Patna, and here in 22nd October two mighty armies The East India Company and the Mughal Army stood in front of each other. From the political point of view it was going to be a hugely important battle, and a number of questions were waiting to be answered. The illustrious days of the Six Mughal Emperors were gone; the Mughal flag of conquest was not one of the deadliest anymore. So evidently what remained was the vanity of the Old Guard put to test time and time again.  So here in the plains of Buxar we have Mughal forces which is comprised of three different entities, one of course is the Mughal Emperor himself, Shah Alam II, second is the Nawab of Awadh Shuja-ud-Dowla(the Grand Vizier to Mughal Emperor), and third the Nawab of Bengal Mir Qasim. We may not call this a coalition force, since the Nawabs of Bengal and Awadh are governors under the Mughal Emperor. That is only in name, the truth is after accession of Shah Alam II as the Mughal Emperor he wanted to consolidate his Empire mostly importantly Bengal presidency which was not paying revenue for a long time. The share of Bengal became one of the prime cause for the animosity between the English and Shah Alam II.

Location of Buxar

In short the equation was this- after the battle of Plassey the Company installed Mir Jafar to the throne as the Nawab of Bengal, Bihar, and Orissa. However by some unscrupulous policy Mir Qasim the son-in-law of Mirjafar got the throne actually bought the throne by buying the company officials. The treaty following the battle of Plassey gave considerable facilities to the English over number of matters, like collection of tax, paying tax duties, and so on. This magnanimous relaxation was slowly the bleeding the Bengal treasury and very soon Mir Qasim took to action and undertook some reformation thus angering the English.